Health Stats

General Stats
  • Only one in three children are physically active every day.1
  • Less than 5% of adults participate in 30 minutes of physical activity each day;2only one in three adults receive the recommended amount of physical activity each week.3
  • Only 35 – 44% of adults 75 years or older are physically active, and 28-34% of adults ages 65-74 are physically active.4
  • More than 80% of adults do not meet the guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities, and more than 80% of adolescents do not do enough aerobic physical activity to meet the guidelines for youth.5
  • In 2013, research found adults in the following states to be most likely to report exercising 3 or more days a week for at least 30 minutes: Vermont (65.3%), Hawaii (62.2%), Montana (60.1%), Alaska (60.1%). The least likely were Delaware (46.5%), West Virginia (47.1%) and Alabama (47.5%). The national average for regular exercise is 51.6%.6
  • Children now spend more than seven and a half hours a day in front of a screen (e.g., TV, videogames, computer).7
  • Typical American diets exceed the recommended intake levels or limits in four categories: calories from solid fats and added sugars; refined grains; sodium; and saturated fat.2
  • Americans eat less than the recommended amounts of vegetables, fruits, whole-grains, dairy products, and oils.2
  • About 90% of Americans eat more sodium than is recommended for a healthy diet.8
  • Reducing the sodium Americans eat by 1,200mg per day on could save up to $20 billion a year in medical costs.8
  • Food available for consumption increased in all major food categories from 1970 to 2008. Average daily calories per person in the marketplace increased approximately 600 calories.2
  • Since the 1970s, the number of fast food restaurants has more than doubled.2
  • More than 23 million Americans, including 6.5 million children, live in food deserts – areas that are more than a mile away from a supermarket.9
  • In 2008, an estimated 49.1 million people, including 16.7 million children, experienced food insecurity (limited availability to safe and nutritionally adequate foods) multiple times throughout the year.10
  • In 2013, residents of the following states were most likely to report eating at least five servings of vegetables four or more days per week: Vermont (68.7%), Montana (63.0%) and Washington (61.8%). The least likely were Oklahoma (52.3%), Louisiana (53.3%) and Missouri (53.8%). The national average for regular produce consumption is 57.7%.6
  • Empty calories from added sugars and solid fats contribute to 40% of total daily calories for 2–18 year olds and half of these empty calories come from six sources: soda, fruit drinks, dairy desserts, grain desserts, pizza, and whole milk.27
  • Obesity-related illness, including chronic disease, disability, and death, is estimated to carry an annual cost of $190.2 billion.17
  • Projections estimate that by 2018, obesity will cost the U.S. 21 percent of our total healthcare costs – $344 billion annually.18
  • Those who are obese have medical costs that are $1,429 more than those of normal weight on average (roughly 42% higher).19
  • The annual cost of being overweight is $524 for women and $432 for men; annual costs for being obese are even higher: $4,879 for women and $2,646 for men.20
Fast Food

1970, there were about 30,000 fast-food restaurants in the United States; that number increased to 222,000 by 2001. This growing trend is concerning as many health consequences come along with a diet full of fast food.

 

50,000 fast food chains across the United States, with McDonalds being the largest restaurant chain at 31,000.  In the world, there are more than 500,000 fast food places

 

McDonalds alone serves 52 million every day (that’s 1 in 6 Americans every day) 18 billion people every year

Kids between the ages of 6 and 14 eat fast food 157,000,000 times every month.

Ninety-six percent of kids in school could recognize an image of Ronald McDonald, the face of   McDonalds. The only recognizable figure that ranked higher was Santa Claus. To top it off,

Americans spend nearly $100 billion on fast food every year.

Walk to burn off my fast food calories- If you have a Big Mac, large fries, and a coke, and go for a moderate walk (3mph), you’ll be walking for 6 hours to burn up those calories.

Not that hungry? If you go for the Big Mac and medium fries and drink, you’re still out there pounding the pavement for 5 hours.

Small size it? 4 hours!!

The US Department of Health and Human Services discovered that the combination of a poor diet and a lack of physical activity causes 310,000 to 580,000 deaths every year. These numbers are significantly higher than deaths caused either by guns or drug use.

 

The types of foods that lead to death are ones with too much saturated fat, sugar and sodium, which all characterize fast foods. Further, fast food meals often do not provide enough healthy food choices, such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables, which is another contributing factor to health problems.

Genetically Modified Foods

Genetically modified foods (or GM foods) are foods produced from organisms that have had specific changes introduced into their DNA using the methods of genetic engineering. These techniques have allowed for the introduction of new traits as well as a far greater control over a food’s genetic structure than previously afforded by methods such as selective breeding and mutation breeding.[1]

Genetically-modified (GM) foods and food ingredients have infiltrated our food supply, tainting what was once healthy. While agri-businesses continue to claim they are safe, increasing amounts of research demonstrate that GM foods are harmful to human health, damage ecosystems, cause financial calamity for many farmers, and release trans genes that could randomly transfer to other life forms in the environment with the potential for disastrous consequences. A growing body of research links genetically-modified food consumption with sterility, allergies, infant mortality, organ defects, childhood illnesses, and cancer.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/top-20-frankenfoods-to-avoid.html#ixzz39RAVJxZ0

**Junk food experiment with kids testing mice- 3 mice in one cage at junk, 3 mice in other cage at fruits and veggies.  Kids noted huge differences between groups.

**We don’t know all the changes that occur with genetic engineering, but certainly GM crops are not the same. Ask the animals. Eyewitness reports from all over North America describe how several types of animals, when given a choice, avoided eating GM food. These included cows, pigs, elk, deer, raccoons, squirrels, rats, and mice. In fact, the Dutch student mentioned above first determined that his mice had a two-to-one preference for non-GM before forcing half of them to eat only the engineered variety.

Differences in GM food will likely have a much larger impact on children. They are three to four times more susceptible to allergies. Also, they convert more of the food into body-building material. Altered nutrients or added toxins can result in developmental problems. For this reason, animal nutrition studies are typically conducted on young, developing animals. After the feeding trial, organs are weighed and often studied under magnification. If scientists used mature animals instead of young ones, even severe nutritional problems might not be detected. The Monsanto study used mature animals instead of young ones.

Unfortunately, there is a much bigger experiment going on—an uncontrolled one which we are all a part of. We’re being fed GM foods daily, without knowing the impact of these foods on our health, our behavior, or our children. Thousands of schools around the world, particularly in Europe, have decided not to let their kids be used as guinea pigs. They have banned GM foods.

http://www.responsibletechnology.org/gmo-dangers/higher-risks-for-children/Another-Reason-for-Schools-to-Ban-Genetically-Engineered-Foods-September-2004

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